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Category Archives: Politics

Edmund Burke and the origins of modern conservatism

Conservatism’s influence on the Western world has been obvious over the past few decades, but it can be difficult to discover the ideology’s oldest roots. David Evans studies Edmund Burke’s legacy to understand why he is often penned as ‘the father of modern conservatism’.

Chile – A new beginning?

Chile has voted for a revision of its 1980 constitution, authored by their haunting former leader, Augusto Pinochet. Is this the moment Chileans take the first step to redressing the fundamental problems caused by the past?

The Bristol Mayoral Election

Camera / Edit by Jason Phillips and Will Edlin Interviewers: David Evans, Tom Rickard, Zac Lloyd, Will Palmer, Alex Wilson and Noah Gassas Hello, I’m David Evans, the Chief Sub-Editor at Berkeley Squares Over the past week, Berkeley Squares has interviewed the five candidates for

Where now for the Republican party?

After Biden’s win in the 2020 American Election, it is clear that the momentum behind the Republican party is weaker than its supporters had hoped. Will the party adapt to changing circumstances and persue a more central agenda, or risk retaining Trumpism and its short-lived success?

Why the government must focus on happiness

“Gross National Happiness is more important than Gross National Product” proclaimed Bhutanese King, Jigme Singye Wangchuk of Bhutan, in 1972. Whilst a simple, this statement completely revolutionised governmental policy. Traditionally, governments solely focused on the economy, believing a strong economy enables them to achieve their

Azerbaijan and Armenia’s New Cold War

Ever since the 1920s, the reigon of Nagorno-Karabakh has caused conflict between Azerbaijan and Armenia. However in recent years, that conflict has broken out into violence, with neither side dangerously eager to maintaining peace. Ishan Goyal reviews the situation.

Is Freedom of Speech Under Attack?

Western society enjoys great liberties when it comes to the right to freedom of speech, however, Patrick O’Reagan questions if our defence of those offended by others’ views is setting a dangerous precedent.